Holidays Calendar for October 30, 2016

Diwali, also known as Deepavali or the Festival of Lights, is a major Hindu festival that falls between mid-October and mid-November in the Gregorian calendar. It is dedicated to the victory of light over darkness.


International Orthopaedic Nurses Day is celebrated by the orthopaedic nurses around the world on October 30. This celebration was started in the USA back in 1990 and it was presented by Senator Carl Levin to then-President George H. W. Bush.

The economy of many African countries totally depend on agriculture, but many people have nothing to eat and starve to death. Annual observation of Africa Day of Food and Nutrition Security on October 30 attracts public attention to this problem.

Day of Automobile Workers is an official professional holiday celebrated in Russia, Belarus, and Ukraine on the last Sunday in October.


Social Workers' Day is an official professional holiday in Kazakhstan celebrated on the last Sunday in October. It was established in 2011.


The Slovaks annually celebrate Anniversary of the Declaration of the Slovak Nation on October 30. This memorial day was established to celebrate the anniversary of official joining of the Slovaks to Czechoslovakia.

October 30 is Day of Remembrance for the Victims of Political Repressions in Russia. This is an official day of remembrance, that was established in 1991 after the dissolution of the Soviet Union.

The National Candy Corn Day is dedicated to a candy popular primarily around Halloween, that's why it is celebrated on October 30.

October 30 is Mischief Night in Northern America and Great Britain. Tonight teenagers and children are engaged in pranks and minor vandalism.

Local Communities Day is an official holiday in Kyrgyzstan celebrated on the last Sunday in October. It was established in 2003 within the framework of the program of state support to local self-government.


This Day in History

  • 2013 A private Volvo bus caught fire in Mahabubnagar District, Andhra Pradesh, India. 45 people were killed and another 7 were injured in the accident.
  • 2009 Died: Claude Lévi-Strauss, French anthropologist and ethnologist who contributed to the development of structuralism and structural anthropology.
  • 2002 Died: Juan Antonio Bardem, Spanish film director and screenwriter. He is best known for his social realist drama Death of a Cyclist released in 1955.
  • 1989 Born: Nastia Liukin, Russian-American artistic gymnast. She represented the United States at three World Championships and one Olympic Games.
  • 1981 Born: Ivanka Trump, American businesswoman, writer, and former fashion model. Ivanka is the daughter of real estate mogul Donald Trump.
  • 1979 Died: Barnes Wallis, English engineer, scientist, and inventor. He is best known as the inventor of the bouncing bomb used in Operation Chastise.
  • 1979 Died: Rachele Mussolini (born Rachele Guidi), the mistress, wife, and widow of Italian dictator Benito Mussolini. She outlived him by 34 years.
  • 1978 Born: Matthew Morrison, American actor of stage and screen and singer-songwriter. Morrison is known for his role as Will Schuester on Glee.
  • 1975 Spanish dictator Francisco Franco gave full control to Prince Juan Carlos. On November 22, two days after Franco's death, he was crowned King of Spain.
  • 1975 Died: Gustav Ludwig Hertz, German experimental physicist who was awarded the 1925 Nobel Prize in Physics, sharing it with James Franck (Germany).
  • 1968 Died: Ramón Novarro (Jose Ramón Gil Samaniego), Mexican actor of stage and screen who began his career as a leading man in silent films in 1917.
  • 1965 English model Jean Shrimpton caused a global sensation by wearing a white minidress to Derby Day at Flemington Racecourse in Melbourne.
  • 1961 The Soviet Union detonated the AN602 hydrogen bomb nicknamed Tsar Bomba. This test the most powerful artificial explosion in human history.
  • 1960 Born: Diego Maradona, Argentine former footballer. Maradona is often regarded as the greatest football player of all time, or at least one of the greatest.
  • 1955 The second referendum on national sovereignty was held in the Canadian province of Quebec. 50.58% of voters voted against sovereignty.
  • 1953 Died: Emmerich (Imre) Kálmán, Hungarian composer known for his operettas, which include Die Csárdásfürstin and Das Veilchen vom Montmartre.
  • 1946 Born: Robert L. Gibson, American pilot, Captain and Naval Aviator in the United States Navy and NASA astronaut. He flew five missions as an astronaut.
  • 1944 Anne Frank (author of The Diary of a Young Girl) and her elder sister Margot were deported from Auschwitz to the Bergen-Belsen concentration camp.
  • 1938 A radio play based on H. G. Wells's novel The War of the Worlds was broadcast on the radio, allegedly causing mass panic in the United States.
  • 1937 Born: Claude Lelouch, French film director, screenwriter, cinematographer, actor, and film producer. Lelouch's best known film is A Man and a Woman.
  • 1918 The Ottoman Empire and the Allies concluded the Armistice of Mudros that ended the hostilities in the Middle Eastern theater of World War I.
  • 1915 Died: Charles Tupper, one of Canadian Fathers of Confederation. Tupper served as the sixth Prime Minister of Canada for sixty-nine days in 1896.
  • 1910 Died: Henry Dunant, Swiss businessman and social activist who founded the Red Cross. He shared the 1901 Nobel Peace Prize with Frédéric Passy.
  • 1900 Born: Ragnar Granit, Finland Swedish physiologist who was awarded the 1967 Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine, sharing it with two scientists.
  • 1857 Born: Georges Gilles de la Tourette, French-Swiss physician and neurologist. He is known for studying the neurological disorder named after him.
  • 1797 Born: John Adams, American Founding Father, statesman, and diplomat who served as the second President of the United States from 1797 to 1801.
  • 1762 Born: André Chénier, French poet of Greek and Franco-Levantine origin regarded as one of the precursors of the Romantic movement.
  • 1611 Died: Charles IX of Sweden, King of Sweden from 1601 until his death. His reign marked the end of both the Reformation and Counter-reformation.
  • 1501 Cardinal Cesare Borgia, son of Pope Alexander VI, held the Banquet of Chestnuts. The guests were entertained by prostitutes and courtesans.
  • 1485 Henry VII was crowned King of England and Lord of Ireland in Westminster Abbey, London. Henry VII was the first monarch of the House of Tudor.