Holidays Calendar for November 14, 2016

Tuvalu is an independent state within the Commonwealth and many British holidays are celebrated there too. At the same time they have certain holidays, that don't exist in other countries, for instance Heir to the Throne Birthday, that is birthday of Charles, Prince of Wales.


Readjustment Movement Day is a public holiday in Guinea-Bissau celebrated on November 14. It commemorates the bloodless coup of 1980 led by João Bernardo Vieira.

Tazaungdaing Festival is one of the public holidays in Myanmar. This event is also known as Festival of Lights and it's celebrated on the full moon of Tazaungmon, the eighth month of the traditional Burmese calendar.

People of the Cayman Islands annually celebrate Remembrance Day on the second Monday in November. This public holiday originates from a British tradition.


Guru Nanak Jayanti is a public holiday, that is observed in many Indian states. This holiday is celebrated on the day of full moon in the month of Katak, that according to the Gregorian calendar falls on October-November.


Day of the Colombian Woman is celebrated on November 14. This observance was established by the Congress of the Republic of Colombia in 1967 to commemorate the death anniversary of Policarpa Salavarrieta, a heroine of the independence of Colombia.

The National Pickle Day is annually celebrated on November 14. A pickle is a cucumber that has been pickled in vinegar, brine, or other solution and left to ferment for some time.

World Diabetes Day is an annual awareness campaign held on November 14. It was inaugurated in 1991 by the International Diabetes Federation. In 2006, the United Nations General Assembly passed Resolution 61/225, designating World Diabetes Day as a UN observance.

Children's Day, also known as Bal Diwas, is a holiday in India celebrated on November 14. Its celebration coincides with the birth anniversary of Jawaharlal Nehru, the first Prime Minister of India.


This Day in History

  • 2012 Israel launched Operation Pillar of Defense, an 8-day operation in the Gaza Strip. The operation aimed to attack Hamas and other terrorist organizations.
  • 2003 90377 Sedna, a large planetoid in the outer reach of the Solar System, was discovered by astronomers Michael E. Brown, Chad Trujillo, and David L. Rabinowitz.
  • 2001 Died: Charlotte Coleman, English actress, best known for playing Scarlett in the film Four Weddings and a Funeral. She died at the age of 33 of an acute asthma attack.
  • 1990 The Federal Republic of Germany and Poland signed a treaty confirming the Ode-Neisse line as the border between Germany and Poland.
  • 1979 President of the USA Jimmy Carter issued Executive order 12170 freezing all Iranian assets in the United States. This action was a respond to the hostage crisis, when 66 American diplomats and citizens were taken hostages in Iran on November 4.
  • 1977 Died: Abhay Charanaravinda Bhaktivedanta Swami Prabhupada, Indian monk and guru. He founded the International Society for Krishna Consciousness.
  • 1970 Southern Airways Flight 932 en route from Kinston, North Carolina to Ceredo, West Virginia crashed in the mountains near Huntington, West Virginia. All 75 people on board were killed, including the members of the Marshall University football team.
  • 1969 NASA launched Apollo 12, the second crewed mission to the surface of the Moon.
  • 1967 American physicist Theodore Maiman was given a patent for his ruby laser system. His invention became the first laser in the world.
  • 1954 Born: Condoleezza Rice, American political scientist and diplomat, the 66th United States Secretary of State. Before joining the administration of President George W. Bush she was a professor of political science at Standford University.
  • 1951 Born: Alec John Such, American musician, the former bassist for the rock band Bon Jovi. He was dismissed from the band in 1994.
  • 1950 Died: Orhan Veli Kanık, Turkish poet. He is known for his aim to transform the Turkish poetry and introduction of colloquialisms in the poetic language.
  • 1941 German forces engaged in Operation Barbarossa against the Soviet Union captured the city of Slonim in Belarus, killing 9,000 Jews in one day.
  • 1937 Born: Hussein bin Talal, King of Jordan from 1952 to his death. He claimed to be a descendant of the prophet Muhammad through his belonging to the ancient Hashemite family.
  • 1922 The British Broadcasting Company began radio service in the United Kingdom.
  • 1915 Died: Booker T. Washington, African-American educator, author and advisor. He was the advisor to the presidents of the USA between 1890 and 1915.
  • 1908 Died: Guangxu, Emperor of China of the Qing Dynasty. His reign lasted from February 25, 1875 to his death.
  • 1907 Born: Astrid Lindgren, Swedish writer, best known for her children's books series about Pippi Longstocking and Karlson-on-the-Roof.
  • 1907 Born: William Steig, American cartoonist and illustrator. He is best known for writing children's books, including Sylvester and the Magic Pebble and Doctor De Soto. He was also the creator of Shrek!, that inspired the film series of the same name.
  • 1891 Born: Frederick Banting, Canadian scientist and physician. He is known as the first person to use insulin on humans. In 1923 he was awarded the Nobel Prize in Physiology of Medicine.
  • 1889 Born: Jawaharlal Nehru, Indian politician. He was a central figure in Indian politics for much of the 20th century, serving as the 1st Prime Minister of India from August 15, 1947 to his death on May 27, 1964.
  • 1889 A journalist Nellie Bly began a successful attempt to travel around the world in less then 80 days. She completed the trip in 72 days.
  • 1866 Died: Miguel I, King of Portugal from July 11, 1828 to May 26, 1834.
  • 1840 Born: Claude Monet, French painter, founder of French Impressionist movement. His painting Impression, Sunrise gave the name to the movement. Monet is best known for pictures, including The Magpie, series of Water Lilies etc.
  • 1796 Born: Mamie Eisenhower, wife of the United States President Dwight D. Eisenhower, First Lady of the United States from 1953 to 1961.
  • 1765 Born: Robert Fulton, American engineer and inventor, widely credited with developing a commercially successful steamboat Clermont. His boat was used to design the Nautilus, the first practical submarine in history.
  • 1716 Died: Gottfried Wilhelm Leibniz, German polymath and philosopher, a prominent person in the history of mathematics and philosophy. He is believed to have developed calculus independently of Isaac Newton.
  • 1687 Died: Nell Gwyn, English mistress of Charles II of England. She was regarded as a living embodiement of Restoration England and became a folk heroine. The story of her life echoed the rags-to-royalty tale of Cinderella.
  • 1556 Died: Giovanni della Casa, Italian poet and archbishop, famous for his treatise on polite behavior Il Galateo overo de’ costumi, that enjoyed enormous success and influence.
  • 1522 Died: Anne of France, the eldest daughter of Louis XI of France and his wife Charlotte of Savoy. She was regent of her brother King Charles VIII of France. As regent of France she was one of the most powerful women of the late 15th century.