Holidays Calendar for December 2, 2016

Saba is one of the islands incorporated in the Netherlands after dissolution of the Netherlands Antilles. Here people annually celebrate Saba Day on the first Friday in December and this holiday is also known as Flag Day.


National Day in Laos is celebrated on December 2. This public holiday commemorates the establishment of the Lao People's Democratic Republic in 1975.

National Day in the United Arab Emirates is celebrated on December 2. It commemorates the formal nationalization of the UAE from the British Protectorate in 1971.

National Farmers' Day is a public holiday in the Republic of Ghana celebrated on the first Friday in December. It was instituted by the government in 1985 in response to a severe drought that had imposed serious burden on the country's farmers. The holiday honors Ghana's farmers and fishers and their contribution to the nation's socioeconomic development.


Gospel Day is a public holiday in the Republic of the Marshall Islands celebrated on the first Friday in December. It commemorates the first missionaries who brought Christianity to the isolated archipelago.


Armed Forces Day in the Republic of Cuba is celebrated on December 2. The holiday commemorates the landing of the yacht Granma in 1956. It is considered to be one of the most important events of the Cuban Revolution.

The National Fritters Day is a food-related holiday celebrated on December 2. Fritters are pan-fried or deep-fried cakes with a wide variety of fillings. Fritter batter is made with milk and egg and is similar to pancake batter.

International Sweater Vestival is a parody of other celebrations and it encourages people wear a sweater vest to work. It's funny, but it's real and it's annually celebrated on the second Friday after Thanksgiving.


National Jandal Day is an annual fundraising event held by Serf Life Saving New Zealand (SLSNZ), the national association that represents voluntary lifeguard clubs across the country. The event is typically launched on December 2.

International Day for the Abolition of Slavery is an annual United Nations observance celebrated on December 2. It was officially established by the UN General Assembly in 1986 to commemorate the adoption of the Convention for the Suppression of the Traffic in Persons and of the Exploitation of the Prostitution of Others in 1949.

This Day in History

  • 2008 Died: Odetta Holmes, better known as Odetta, American singer, actress, songwriter and activist. She is often referred to as "The Voice of the Civil Rights Movement". She was an important figure in the American folk music revival of the 1950s and 1960s and influential to many of key figures of folk-revival of that time, including Bob Dylan and Janis Joplin.
  • 1987 Died: Luis Federico Leloir, Argentinian physician and chemist. He is known for discovery of the metabolic pathways in lactose, that won him the 1970 Nobel Prize in Chemistry.
  • 1982 Died: Giovanni Ferrari, Italian football player. He is regarded as one of the best players of his generation and one of the greatest players of all time, having won the Serie A 8 times and 2 consecutive FIFA World Cup titles with the Italy national football team.
  • 1982 Barney Clark, a dentist from Seattle, became the first person to receive a permanent artificial heart.
  • 1981 Born: Britney Spears, American singer and actress. Her first and second studio albums Baby One More Time and Oops!... I Did It Again brought her international fame. She was established as a pop icon and credited with influencing the revival of teen pop during the late 1990s.
  • 1978 Born: Christopher Wolstenholme, English musician. He is known as the bassist, backing vocalist and vocalist for the alternative rock band Muse.
  • 1978 Born: Nelly Furtado, Canadian singer and songwriter. Her most famous songs include I'm Like a Bird, Turn Off the Light, Powerless, Try and Força.
  • 1976 Fidel Castro replaced Osvaldo Dorticós Torrado, becoming President of Cuba.
  • 1968 Born: Lucy Liu, American actress and model. She rose to prominence playing the role of Ling Woo in the TV series Ally McBeal. Her other successful works include Shanghai Noon, Charlie's Angels, Chicago, Kill Bill, Elementary.
  • 1960 Born: Rick Savage, English singer-songwriter and bass player, one of the founding members of the English rock band Def Leppard.
  • 1947 The Arab Higher Committee started strikes and protests in Jerusalem against the United Nations Partition Plan for Palestine, issued three days earlier on November 29.
  • 1946 Born: Gianni Versace, Italian fashion designer, founder of Versace fashion hose, producing accessories, fragrances, make-up, home furniture and clothes.
  • 1942 The Manhattan Project: a team led by Enrico Fermi initiated the first self-sustaining nuclear chain reaction.
  • 1936 Died: John Ringling, American businessman, the most well-known of the seven Ringling brothers. He was one of the co-founders of Ringling Brothers Circus, that created a virtual monopoly of traveling circuses and helped shape the circus into what it is today.
  • 1927 The Ford Motor Company unveiled the Ford Model A, the new automobile after consequent 19 years of Ford Model T production.
  • 1923 Born: Maria Callas, Greek opera singer. Callas is known for her bel canto technique, wide ranging soprano voice and dramatic interpretations, that made her one of the most renowned and influential opera singers of the 20th century.
  • 1918 Died: Edmond Rostand, French poet and dramatist, best known for his play Cyrano de Bergerac.
  • 1908 Puyi, the twelfth and final ruler of the Qing dynasty, became Emperor of China at the age of two.
  • 1885 Born: George Minot, American physician and academic, remembered as the 1934 Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine laureate for his pioneering work on pernicious anemia.
  • 1881 Died: Jenny von Westphalen, German author, wife of the philosopher Karl Marx. They had 7 children, only three of them survived: Jenny Caroline, Jenny Laura and Jenny Julia Eleanor.
  • 1867 British author Charles Dickens gave his first public reading in the United States of America. This event took place at Tremont Temple in Boston.
  • 1859 Died: John Brown, American activist against the slavery in the United States. He was responsible for numerous slave uprisings in the Caribbean.
  • 1859 Born: Georges Seurat, French painter and draftsman. Seurat is noted for his innovative use of drawing media and for devising the painting techniques chromoluminarism and pointillism. His painting A Sunday Afternoon on the Island of La Grande Jatte is one of the icons of the late 19th century painting.
  • 1837 Born: Joseph Bell, Scottish lecturer. He is best known as an inspiration for the literary character Sherlock Holmes.
  • 1823 President of the USA James Monroe proclaimed American neutrality in future European conflicts and warned European powers not to interfere in the Americas.
  • 1814 Died: Marquis de Sade, French philosopher, author, and politician. He is famous for his erotic novels, short stories and plays, depicting sexual fantasies with an emphasis on violence, criminality and blasphemy against the Catholic Church.
  • 1804 Napoleon Bonaparte crowned himself Emperor of the French at Notre Dame Cathedral in Paris, becoming the first French Emperor in a thousand years.
  • 1775 American naval fighter John Paul Jones hoisted the Grand Union Flag on the USS Alfred. The vessel became the first one to fly this flag, which is known as the precursor to the Stars and Stripes.
  • 1665 Died: Catherine de Vivonne, marquise de Rambouillet, French author, an influential figure in the literary history of the 17th-century France.
  • 1547 Died: Hernán Cortés, Spanish conquistador. He was the head of expedition that caused the fall of the Aztec Empire and brought large ares of mainland Mexico under Spanish rule.