Holidays Calendar for May 15, 2016

The independence of Paraguay from Spain was declared on May 14 and 15, 1811 after a bloodless revolution led by José Gaspar Rodríguez de Francia. Paraguay Independence Day is a public holiday celebrated for two days.

The King's birthday is one of the national holidays in Cambodia. The reigning King of Cambodia Norodom Shiamoni was born on May 14, 1953. The festivities last for three days, from May 13 to May 15.

Pentecost is one of the major religious holidays in Western Christianity. It always falls on the 50th day after Easter, commemorating the descent of the Holy Spirit upon the Apostles.


International AIDS Candlelight Memorial is an annual campaign held on the third Sunday in May. It is coordinated by GNP+ – Global Network of People Living with HIV.


In Colombia, Teachers' Day celebration is annually held on May 15. This is one of the most popular professional holidays in Colombia, that's why the teachers eagerly wait for this day.

The teachers of South Korea annually observe Teachers' Day, their professional holiday, on May 15. This holiday has a long history, that saw date changes and even cancellation.

Teachers' Day exists in many countries, but it's celebrated on different dates. Teachers of Mexico observe their professional holiday annually on May 15.

Armed Forces Day is annually observed in Slovenia on May 15. This is a professional holiday of people serving in the armed forces.

Konstantineoba is a traditional public festival in Georgia, that annually takes place on May 15. The festival is dedicated to the great classic Georgian writer Konstantine Gamsakhurdia.

Lithuania annually observes Constituent Assembly Day on May 15. This day commemorates the first meeting of the Assembly in 1920.

The Day of Remembrance for the Victims of Political Repressions in Ukraine is observed on the third Sunday in May every year. It was officially established in 2007 by President Viktor Yuschenko.


Peace Officers Memorial Day is observed annually on May 15. This holiday is a part of Police Week.

Each year International Day of Conscientious Objector is marked around the world on May 15. This observance raises awareness of people, who refuse to participate in armed conflicts.

The State of Palestine and all Palestinian people living in other countries annually observe Nakba Day on May 15. This is an annual commemoration day of the displacement of the Palestinians.

Memorial Day for the War Dead is a remembrance day and an official flag day in Finland. It is held on the third Sunday in May each year.


Chocolate chips are an essential ingredient in many recipes. Cookies, muffins, pancakes, brownies and even more require chocolate chips. And today, on May 15, we celebrate National Chocolate Chip Day.

International Day of Families is annually observed on May 15. This holiday was proclaimed by the UN General Assembly in 1993. The first observation took place on May 15, 1994.

Mother's Day in Paraguay is celebrated on May 15, coinciding with Paraguayan Independence Day (Dia de la Patria). This date was chosen to honor the contribution of Juana María de Lara to the proclamation of Paraguay's independence.

While the United States and many other countries celebrate Mother's Day on the second Sunday in May, in Kyrgyzstan this holiday falls on the third Sunday in May. It was officially established in 2012.


Citizens of the Kingdom of Tonga celebrate Father's Day on the third Sunday in May each year. It comes a week after Mother's Day.


This Day in History

  • 2012 Died: Carlos Fuentes, Mexican novelist and essayist whose best known works include The Death of Artemio Cruz, Aura, and Terra Nostra.
  • 2012 Died: Jean Craighead George, American author known for her books for children and young adults such as Julie of the Wolves and My Side of the Mountain.
  • 2010 16-year-old Australian sailor Jessica Watson became the youngest person to sail non-stop, solo and unassisted around the world.
  • 2009 Died: Bud Tingwell, Australian film, television, theater and radio actor whose career spanned almost seven decades. He appeared in more than 100 films.
  • 2009 Died: Rodger McFarlane, American gay rights activist who served as the first paid executive director of the Gay Men's Health Crisis.
  • 1991 Édith Cresson became the first female Prime Minister of France. However, she was unpopular and had to leave office after less than one year.
  • 1971 Died: Tyrone Guthrie, English theatrical director, producer, and playwright who founded the Stratford Shakespeare Festival in Ontario, Canada.
  • 1967 Died: Edward Hopper, American painter and printmaker whose best known works include Automat, Chop Suey, and Office in a Small City.
  • 1952 Born: Phil Seymour, American singer-songwriter, drummer, guitarist, and record producer best known for his singles I'm on Fire and Precious to Me.
  • 1949 Born: Frank Lee Culbertson, Jr., American aviator, test pilot, aerospace engineer, and NASA astronaut. He served as the commander of the ISS in 2001.
  • 1948 The First Arab-Israeli war began, following Israel's declaration of independence. Israel was attacked by Egypt, Iraq, Syria, and Transjordan.
  • 1941 The Gloster E.28/39 (also known as Gloster Pioneer or Gloster Whittle) made its first flight. It was the first British and Allied jet-engined aircraft.
  • 1940 Brothers Richard and Maurice ("Dick" and "Mac") McDonald opened the first McDonald's restaurant in San Bernardino, California.
  • 1935 The Moscow Metro was opened to the public with one line and 13 stations. It was the first underground railway system in the USSR.
  • 1935 Died: Kazimir Malevich, Russian painter and art theoretician who a pioneer of geometric abstract art. His best known works is Black Square.
  • 1935 Born: Utah Phillips, American folk singer, songwriter, poet, storyteller, and labor organizer. He was known as the "Golden Voice of the Great Southwest".
  • 1915 Born: Paul Samuelson, American economist who was awarded the 1970 Nobel Memorial Prize in Economic Sciences. He was the first American to win this prize.
  • 1911 Standard Oil was declared to be an "unreasonable" monopoly under the Sherman Antitrust Act. The US Supreme Court ruled that it must be dissolved.
  • 1911 Born: Max Frisch, Swiss novelist and playwright. One of his best known works is the 1957 novel Homo Faber that has been translated into many languages.
  • 1905 The city of Las Vegas was founded in Nevada when 110 acres of land adjacent to the Union Pacific Railroad tracks were auctioned off.
  • 1891 Born: Mikhail Bulgakov, Russian novelist and playwright best known for his novel The Master and Margarita, which is considered one of the best novels of the 20th century.
  • 1886 Died: Emily Dickinson, American poet. She wrote nearly 1800 poems, but only about a dozen of them were published during her lifetime.
  • 1879 Died: Gottfried Semper, German architect and art critic primarily remembered for designing and building the Semper Opera House in Dresden.
  • 1859 Born: Pierre Curie, French physicist who was awarded the 1903 Nobel Prize in Physics together with his wife Maria Skłodowska-Curie and Henri Becquerel.
  • 1856 Born: L. Frank Baum, American author primarily known for his children's books, particularly The Wonderful Wizard of Oz and its sequels.
  • 1845 Born: Ilya Mechnikov, Russian biologist who was awarded the 1908 Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine for his work on immunity, sharing it with Paul Elrich.
  • 1648 The Peace of Münster between Spain and the Dutch Republic was officially ratified. It was the first peace treaty in the Peace of Westphalia.
  • 1567 Born: Claudio Monteverdi, Italian composer whose work marked the transition from the Renaissance style of music to that of the Baroque period.
  • 1252 Pope Innocent IV issued the papal bull Ad extirpanda which authorized the use of torture by the Inquisition for eliciting confessions from heretics.
  • 1157 Died: Yuri I Vladimirovich, also known as Yuri Dolgorukiy, Russian prince who is primarily remembered as the founder of the city of Moscow.