Holidays Calendar for January 9, 2016

The second Saturday of January is Children's Day in Thailand. Children are the most valuable for Thailand that's why the Children's Day celebration plays such a significant role for government.


Bosnia and Herzegovina consists of two entities: the Republika Srpska and the Federation of Bosnia and Herzogovina. Both entities have their own holidays. And January 9 is Republic Day in the Republika Srpska.

January 9 is Comprehensive Peace Agreement Day in South Sudan. This holiday is a very important one in a short history of modern Republic of South Sudan.

January 9 is Martyr's Day in Panama. This day commemorates the memory of all people who died during the riots in 1964 caused by the conflict between Panamanian students and Canal Zone Police officers.

There is a saying that dreaming of apricots brings you a good luck. Try savory-sweet apricots and cook them for National Apricot Day on January 9.

Non-resident Indian Day (Pravasi Bharatiya Divas) is an annual holiday celebrated in India on January 9. It was established to recognize the contribution of the overseas Indian community to the country's development.

This Day in History

  • 2024 Died: James M. Buchanan, American economist and academic, Nobel Prize laureate for his work on public choice theory. His work initiated research on how politician's self-interest and non-economic forces affect government economic policy.
  • 2014 An explosion at Mitsubishi Materials chemical plant in Yakkaichi, Japan, caused the death of at least 5 people and injures of 17 others.
  • 2011 Iran Air Flight 277 crashed near Urmia, Iran. 77 people killed.
  • 2007 After years of rumors and speculation Steve Jobs unveiled the iPhone of the first generation.
  • 1998 Died: Kenichi Fukui, Japanese chemist, the Nobel Prize laureate for investigations into the mechanism of chemical reactions.
  • 1998 Died: Imi Lichtenfeld, Slovakian-Israeli martial artist. He is known as the founder of Krav Maga defense system. This system consists of wide combination of techniques taken from boxing, Judo, Jujutsu, grappling, wrestling, savate, Muay Thai and Wing Chun.
  • 1995 Died: Peter Cook, English comedian and actor. Cook was an extremely influential figure in modern British comedy. He also was closely associated with anti-establishment comedy emerged in Britain and the U.S. in 50s.
  • 1978 Born: A. J. McLean, American singer-songwriter, dancer, and actor. He is known as a member of Backstreet Boys. McLean is also a contributor to the project It Gets Better.
  • 1970 Born: Lara Fabian (original name Lara Crokaert), Belgian-Italian singer known for songs in French, Italian and English. Among her works are also songs in Portuguese, Russian, Hebrew, German, Greek, Turkish and Spanish.
  • 1961 Died: Emily Greene Balch, American economist, Nobel Prize laureate for her work with the Women's International League for Peace and Freedom. She is also known for her help of setting up summer schools on peace education in over 50 countries.
  • 1959 Born: Rigoberta Menchú, Guatemalan activist, the Nobel Prize and Princess of Asturias Award laureate and UNESCO Goodwill Ambassador. Menchú is known for promotion of indigenous rights of Guatemalan K'iche' ethnic group.
  • 1957 British Prime Minister Sir Anthony Eden resigned from office after he failed to retake the Suez Canal from Egyptian sovereignty.
  • 1947 Elizabeth "Betty" Short, the Black Dahlia, was last seen alive. Short's murder is one of the most gruesome and much-publicized murders in Los Angeles history. This murder case is still unsolved.
  • 1944 Born: Jimmy Page, English guitarist, songwriter, and producer. He achieved international success as the guitarist and leader of Led Zeppelin.
  • 1939 Born: Jimmy Boyd, American singer, musician and actor. Best known for recording of the song I Saw Mommy Kissing Santa Claus.
  • 1936 Died: John Gilbert, American actor, director and screenwriter. Gilbert became famous during silent film era and gained popularity as "The Great Lover".
  • 1935 Born: Earl G. Graves, Sr., American businessman and publisher. He was the founder of Black Enterprise magazine, a magazine that described itself as the "premier business news and investment resource for African Americans".
  • 1927 78 children burned alive at the Laurier Palace movie theater in Montreal, Canada.
  • 1923 Died: Katherine Mansfield, New Zealand author. She was the prominent modernist writer of short fiction, started publication at the age of 9.
  • 1923 Juan de la Cierva made the first autogyro flight.
  • 1918 Died: Charles-Émile Reynaud, French scientist and educator, the inventor of praxinoscope, an animation device that consisted of strip of pictures placed around the inner surface of a spinning cylinder.
  • 1913 Born: Richard Nixon, American politician and the 37th President of the United States. He is the only one president who resigned the office in the history of the U.S.
  • 1909 The Nimrod Expedition to the South Pole led by Ernest Shackleton planted the British flag 97 nautical miles from the South Pole. At that time this was the farthest distance anyone had ever reached.
  • 1902 Born Josemaría Escrivá, Spanish priest and saint. He founded Opus Dei, an institution of the Roman Catholic Church that teaches that the ordinary life is also a path to holiness.
  • 1894 New England Telephone and Telegraph installed the first battery-operated telephone switchboard in Lexington, Massachusetts.
  • 1878 Born: John Broadus Watson, American psychologist and establisher of the psychological school of behaviorism.
  • 1873 Died: Louis-Napoléon Bonaparte, the first President of the French Second Republic and the Emperor of the Second French Empire (as Napoleon III).
  • 1859 Born: Carrie Chapman Catt, American activist and founder of the League of Women Voters and the International Alliance of Women.
  • 1793 Jean-Pierre Blanchard made the first flight in a balloon in the United States.
  • 1757 Died: Louis Bertrand Castel, French mathematician, known for his work in optics. Castel criticized Newton's spectral description of prismatic color in which he observed the colors of white light. Castel's argument was later developed by Goethe and included to his book Theory of Colors.