Lag Ba'Omer Date in the current year: May 26, 2016

Lag Ba'Omer Lag Ba'Omer is a Jewish holiday observed on the 33d day of the Counting of the Omer, important counting of the days between the festivals of Passover and Shavuot, in other words between the anniversaries of the day the Jewish people left Egypt and the day God gave them Torah.

Lag Ba'Omer literally means “the 33d day in the Omer”. According to gematria, each Hebrew letter has a numerical value. “Lag” stands for the letters Lamed and Gimmel adding up to 33.

The origins of this minor Jewish festival are somewhat unclear. It was originally identified as the death anniversary of rabbi Simeon bar Yochai. Later it also began to be associated with the Bar Kokhba revolt, a Jewish rebellion against the Roman Empire, and Rabbi Akiva.

The most well-known customs of this holiday are bonfire lighting and bow-and-arrow play symbolizing Simon Bar Kokhba's military victories during the revolt. Families go on outings and picnics, numerous parties are organized. Ashkenazi Jews often schedule weddings for this day because Omer is a semi-mourning period when weddings are prohibited, but this restriction is lifted on Lag Ba'Omer.

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Lag Ba'Omer, Jewish holidays, religious holiday, Counting of the Omer, Bar Kokhba revolt